brandenburgh gate germany

Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com

 

Today’s post comes from Linda Hamilton again and is another reflection on how she continues to build her self-confidence since participating in the first group of the Epilepsy Futures programme.

As detailed in her post from June 20th (“Mindful of the changes”) Linda’s courage in telling people about her epilepsy has grown so much since I first met her in October last year.

This has had an impact on her ability to engage more readily with community based activities (such as the course mentioned in the above post) and being open about her epilepsy  in general conversation.

She has been helping us in the delivery of a six week block of relaxation and meditation sessions since early July, sharing her own experiences and the benefits she has gained from mindfulness.

Last week she helped out with Epilepsy Connections occasional events for children and young people with epilepsy and their families. The group was at Electric Karting where the young people had the chance to try go-karting, as well as other activities, and Linda fitted in perfectly. In fact it seemed she (and Steven Connelly, who was also helping) had always been a part of the team.

Additionally, she has also been attending events organised for the European Championships 2018 currently taking place in Glasgow.

Linda sent me the following email this morning about something she became involved with on the spur of the minute last week, at Glasgow Green, where volunteers were helping to create a cardboard replica of the  Brandenburg Gate,  to celebrate the co hosting city of Berlin.

I helped out the people who were building the Brandenberg Gate out of cardboard at Glasgow Green on Friday,.

They didn’t have enough people so I ended up being the “tape lady” – giving out sticky tape and using my powers of persuasion to get people to come help us do it, don’t know where I got the confidence.

I just found myself speaking to loads of people, would not have done that before (Epilepsy) Futures, as I was always worried I would have a seizure mid sentence!

Well in fact I did have a seizure but my daughter was close by and when I came out of it I just carried on.

I also told some people I had epilepsy (when it was appropriate) not just randomly going about telling people. I had a great time, and am starting to feel proud of myself!

Peter Dale